Somaliland ambassador calls for unity as they fight for recognition | observer.ug

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Monday July 02, 2018 - 16:27:20 in News In English
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    Somaliland ambassador calls for unity as they fight for recognition | observer.ug

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Ambassador of Somaliland in Uganda, Hemse Abdul

The Ambassador of Somaliland in Uganda, Hemse Abdul said it’s high time, that the international community recognised Somaliland as an independent state to allow them deal with their problems effectively.

"We need to strongly unite for the welfare of our nation, peaceful coexistence and defence in a united voice as one wherever we are in the world,” Abdul said.

He praised what he called a flourishing relationship with Uganda that has allowed them settle in peacefully. Majority of Somalis from Somaliland living in Uganda are students studying from different institutions. Others are businessmen who have lived in Uganda for a long time including others who were born here. Somaliland, which is located in the horn of Africa; celebrates two independence days in a year - one in May and the other in June.

They gained their independence from the British protectorate of North Ireland on June 26 1960 but were later amalgamated with neighbouring Somalia. However after the fall of long-time dictator Said Barre that saw Somalia plunge into a long civil war that persists to this day, in 1991 Somaliland broke away unliterary declaring independence on May 18.

"Due to various political and social issues the fruits of the reunion didn’t turn out positively, people of Somaliland suffered systematic discrimination, injustice, characterised with massive killings. We couldn’t continue with the marriage,” Hamse said.

He adds that the position to dissolve the reunion and regain their independence, 27 years ago has seen unprecedented levels of improvement in peace and stability, private sector development, human rights infrastructure development among others.

The ultimate objective for the past 27 years of the sparsely populated nation of four million people has been getting international recognition and Hemsi says it will remain so until they acquire it.





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